gm.mpmn-digital.com
New recipes

TV Chef Jacques Pépin Is Recovering From a Stroke

TV Chef Jacques Pépin Is Recovering From a Stroke



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


Beloved TV chef Jacques Pépin, 79, is recovering at his home in Connecticut after suffering a minor stroke

Chef Jacques Pépin, who began his TV career with Julia Child, is expected to make a full recovery.

Chef Jacques Pépin, 79, well-known as one of TV’s first chef personalities, is recovering at his home in Connecticut after suffering a minor stroke on Sunday. on Friday, but is otherwise expected to return to his normal schedule, according to The Associated Press.

“Oh my god, he made soup this morning,” Pépin’s daughter told the Associated Press. “I will do my best to lighten the load, but he's not of the mind to cancel anything. Honestly, he wanted to go to IACP. He's like, `I'm talking. I can walk. Let's go.'"

Pépin got his start on TV on Cooking in Concert: Julia Child & Jacques Pépin, as well as Julia & Jacques Cooking at Home, which aired on PBS in 1995, and from 1999 to 2000. Now, 15 years later, Pépin will end his career as a TV chef personality with his final show, premiering this fall, Jacques Pépin: Heart & Soul, which will celebrate his culinary journey, favorite recipes, and feature a special dinner for his 80th birthday. The show will be accompanied by a cookbook release.


Jacques Pepin Wife, Daughter, Grand Daughter, Net Worth: 11 Facts You Should Know.

Jacques Pepin is a French Celebrity Chef, writer, culinary instructor, and reality television personality. He is synonymous with the PBS show, the complete Pepin. Stay with us to know chef Jacques Pepin’s net worth.

In regards to his work as an author, Jacques is credited with works such as La Technique, which was released back in 1976. A lengthy career in the culinary arts has seen him collect accolades like the Légion d’honneur, as well as about 20 different James Beard Awards.

Journey with us as we explore 11 facts you should know about Pepin. These include details about his wife and granddaughter.


Television chef Jacques Pepin recovering from minor stroke

Jacques Pepin, the French chef who helped introduce generations of Americans to refined cuisine, is recovering after suffering a minor stroke.

Pepin, 79, was at his Connecticut home with friends Sunday evening when he began displaying symptoms of a stroke. He received prompt treatment and was released from the hospital Tuesday, his daughter, Claudine Pepin, told The Associated Press. He is expected to make a full recovery.

Pepin canceled an appearance this Friday at the annual International Association of Culinary Professionals conference in Washington, D.C. He’d planned to attend a party in honor of his upcoming 80th birthday, but instead will make a statement via video conference. His daughter says Pepin otherwise is committed to returning to his normal schedule.

“Oh my god, he made soup this morning,” she said. “I will do my best to lighten the load, but he’s not of the mind to cancel anything. Honestly, he wanted to go to IACP. He’s like, ‘I’m talking. I can walk. Let’s go.’”

Pepin learned to cook as a child in France at his mother’s restaurants. He later served as the personal chef to French president Charles De Gaulle, then moved to the United States in 1959 for a job at New York’s Le Pavilion, the iconic French restaurant that introduced Americans to fine dining. Pepin later starred in numerous public television cooking series, including several on-air collaborations with Julia Child.

His final public television series — “Jacques Pepin: Heart & Soul — airs this fall, and will be accompanied by a new cookbook, “Jacques Pepin: Heart and Soul in the Kitchen.”


Jacques Pepin is Married to wife Gloria Pépin since 1966.

Who isn’t interested in celebrities’ love life? Jacques got married to Gloria in 1966, and they’ve been together for fifty-three (53) mind-blowing years, always moving along as inseparable lovebirds. Their story is indeed a special one.

Gloria Pépin, in a granted interview, noted that she met her husband on the Ski ropes. She said he looked handsome, and somehow, she wanted to get along and know him. She, however, admitted that she wasn’t sure of his sexuality, but as they got together, all doubts were cleared.

Even amidst challenges, the couple spends each day intentionally loving each other. Fifty-three years doesn’t come easy. What do you think?

Jacques Pepin was born in 1935.

Jacques Pépin was born on December 18th in the year 1935 in Bourg-en-Bresse, France, 35 miles North of Lyon. That makes him about 85 years of age!

Jacques Pepin’s wife Gloria Pépin Is Alive.

You probably have heard the rumor, one way or another, that Jacques’s wife is dead, haven’t you? It’s impressive how rumors spread, even fast. Get set for the truth! Jacque’s wife, Gloria Pépin, isn’t dead! Unfortunately, another Gloria Pépin’s death had been mistaken for hers.

Well, this other Gloria Pépin was the beloved wife of Joseph R. Pépin (also late). And she passed away peacefully on Saturday, November 1st, 2014, at St. Francis Hospital. So, there you have it.

Gloria Pépin, the wife of Jacques Pépin, is fully alive and kicking. Jacques’ wife’s death is a rumor which, deliberately or ignorantly, arose from the mistaken identity of two distinct personalities.

Now, add this to the shelf. Gloria Pépin has been married to Jacques Pépin since September 18th, 1966. They have just one child, Claudine Pépin.

She is the mother-in-law of Rollie Wesen and the grandmother of Shorey Wesen. She has appeared on quite a number of Jacques Pépin’s cooking shows, both in archive footage and in real life.

Jacques and wife Gloria Pépin Have a Daughter, Claudine Pépin.

Jacques has a daughter, and she was born on December 16th, 1968, in the USA as Claudine Renee Pépin. She is an actress, popularly known for Jacques Pépin’s Kitchen: Cooking with Claudine (1996), Heart & Soul (2015), and American Masters (1985).

She’s happily married to Rolland “Rolley” Bailey Wesen as far back as March 23rd, 2003, and they have one child. That is, of course, Shorey Wesen.

Claudine made her first cooking debut show, “Cooking with Claudine,” in 1995. Although she had not learned how to cook, she had worked on culinary jobs several times with her father.

Perhaps it was Jacque’s way of teaching her the art of cooking. Boom! The father/daughter duo became a PBS TV hit!

Did Claudine go to school? Sure, she did. After all, her father is a graduate as well. She has a first degree in Political Science and Philosophy. And she also notably graduated from Boston University with a Master’s degree in International Relations.

He has a granddaughter Shorney Wesen.

Jacques Pépin, on one occasion, asked his then two-year-old granddaughter, Shorey Wesen, if she liked blueberries of which she affirmed in the positive.

She got early brightness as regards food, and this wasn’t surprising because her father and grandfather are professional chefs themselves. Plus, her mother cooks a whole lot using fresh ingredients.

At the age of 5, Shorey frequently visited her grandparents, primarily because of her interest in helping her old man cook. She practically grew enthusiastic and comfortable in the kitchen early on.

Both Shorey and her mum loved to eat what grown-ups eat, and this developed a gourmand’s palate for them. In the long run, it birthed Jacques’s longstanding philosophy that “great meals are always the ones that are shared with family and friends.” It formed the basis for A Grandfather’s Lessons: In the Kitchen with Shorey (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2017).

Awards.

Jacque Pépin is not without a plethora of exciting accolades. Definitely, he is. Below are some awards and honors conferred on him:

  • Chevalier de L’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres(1997)
  • Chevalier de L’Ordre du Mérite Agricole(1992)
  • France’s Légion d’honneur. In October 2004
  • Has notably received 24 James Beard Foundation
  • On February 5th, 2010, Pépin was named an honorary commodore of the Oceania Cruises
  • He has also received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree from Boston University on May 22nd, 2011.
  • In October 2011, Pépin was amazingly the recipient of the first-ever tribute dinner at the New York Food and Wine Festival.
  • In May 2017, Pépin received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from Columbia University.

Jacques Pépin Net Worth.

Jacques Pépin is a French chef, a T.V. personality, and an author whose net worth amounts to a sum of $20 million. He has amassed wealth from food, T.V. engagements, books, and of course, his services over the years.

TV Career.

Pépin earned a B.A. and M.A. from Columbia University. In 2000, he hosted the television series Julia & Jacques Cooking at Home. From 2013 to 2014, he frequently appeared as a chef on the T.V. series, Rachael Ray.

For Julia & Jacques Cooking at Home, Pépin won a Daytime Emmy Award in 2001 for Outstanding Service Show Host and had been nominated for the same award in the previous year, 2000. Below is a shortlist of his television engagements.

  • PBS series, The Complete Pépin(1997)
  • PBS series Julia and JacquesCookingat Home (1999)
  • Jacques Pépin: Fast Food My Way(based on his 2004 book of the same name) ran on PBS,
  • Jacques Pépin: More Fast Food My Way, broadcast on PBS’ Create.
  • Pépin was a guest judge on season five of the Bravo television show Top Chef, aired in 2008.
  • A guest on the television show, Wahlburgers episode called “Pauli Day.”
  • In 2015, his television series Jacques Pépin Heart & Soulbegan airing.
  • “Jacques Pépin: The Art of Craft,” a documentary about his life, aired as part of the PBS series American Masters, premiering May 26th, 2017.

Restaurants.

In 1970, Pépin actually launched a specialty soup restaurant and lunch counter on Manhattan’s 5th Avenue, naming it La Potagerie. However, the restaurant was closed in 1975, a year after he had a near-fatal car accident in 1974.

He and his partners could not agree on specific terms in the restaurant. After his accident, he became a restaurant consultant. He started working for the restaurateur, Joe Baum, towards his Windows on the World project.

Recently, Oceania Cruise Lines’ Marina or Riviera Cruise Ship houses a culinary cruise that includes “Jacques” restaurant, which is Jacques Pépin’s own restaurant at sea.

Jacques Pépin Recipe.

These are from Jacques Pépin’s Heart & Soul

  • Grilled Snapper with Olive Topping
  • Poulet à la Crème
  • Camembert with Pistachio Crust
  • Apple Galette

And, there you have it, 11 interesting facts about JACQUES PÉPIN you should know – Now you know!


Television chef Jacques Pepin recovering from minor stroke

FILE – This May 5, 2014 file photo shows Jacques Pepin in New York. The French chef who introduced generations of Americans to refined cuisine, is recovering after suffering a minor stroke. Pepin, 79, was at his Connecticut home with friends Sunday evening, March, 22, 2015 when he began displaying symptoms of a stroke. He [&hellip]

Jacques Pepin, the French chef who helped introduce generations of Americans to refined cuisine, is recovering after suffering a minor stroke.

Pepin, 79, was at his Connecticut home with friends Sunday evening when he began displaying symptoms of a stroke. He received prompt treatment and was released from the hospital Tuesday, his daughter, Claudine Pepin, told The Associated Press. He is expected to make a full recovery.

Pepin canceled an appearance this Friday at the annual International Association of Culinary Professionals conference in Washington, D.C. He’d planned to attend a party in honor of his upcoming 80th birthday, but instead will make a statement via video conference. His daughter says Pepin otherwise is committed to returning to his normal schedule.

“Oh my god, he made soup this morning,” she said. “I will do my best to lighten the load, but he’s not of the mind to cancel anything. Honestly, he wanted to go to IACP. He’s like, ‘I’m talking. I can walk. Let’s go.'”

Pepin learned to cook as a child in France at his mother’s restaurants. He later served as the personal chef to French president Charles De Gaulle, then moved to the United States in 1959 for a job at New York’s Le Pavilion, the iconic French restaurant that introduced Americans to fine dining. Pepin later starred in numerous public television cooking series, including several on-air collaborations with Julia Child.

His final public television series – “Jacques Pepin: Heart & Soul – airs this fall, and will be accompanied by a new cookbook, “Jacques Pepin: Heart and Soul in the Kitchen.”

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


Jacques Pepin's last series for KQED shares his 'Heart & Soul'

1 of 21 Jacques Pepin, the French chef and host of KQED's "Heart and Soul" cooking show, talks with producer Tina Salter before taping at KQED in San Francisco, Calif., Monday, October 13, 2014. Jason Henry / Special To The Chronicle Show More Show Less

2 of 21 Jacques Pepin and his granddaughter, Shorey Wesen, 10, appear onscreen on the set of KQED’s “Heart and Soul,” Pepin’s latest, and last, cooking show, he says. Jason Henry / Special To The Chronicle Show More Show Less

4 of 21 Before taping his cooking show for KQED, chef Jacques Pepin looks over some of his paintings to be used in a children’s cookbook. Jason Henry / Special To The Chronicle Show More Show Less

5 of 21 Jacques Pepin (center) looks at images on an iPhone with Laureen Chang (left) of KQED, and Beth Robinson of KitchenAid, during a KQED dinner at the Cavalier. Jason Henry / Special To The Chronicle Show More Show Less

7 of 21 Jacques Pepin (left) greets DeLinda Mrowka of KQED and other guests before taping at the KQED studio in S.F. Jason Henry / Special To The Chronicle Show More Show Less

8 of 21 Jacques Pepin talks with granddaughter Shorey Wesen, 10, before taping at KQED. Jason Henry / Special To The Chronicle Show More Show Less

10 of 21 Chef Jacques Pepin listens for the day’s specials at a dinner hosted by KQED at the Cavalier in S.F. The chef, who will turn 80 next year, says it will be his last cooking series. Jason Henry / Special To The Chronicle Show More Show Less

11 of 21 Before taping a segment for “Heart & Soul,” Pepin tastes some of the items for that day’s show. Jason Henry / Special To The Chronicle Show More Show Less

13 of 21 Ingredients line a counter in the back kitchen before Jacques Pepin tapes his latest show, “Heart and Soul,” for KQED in S.F. Jason Henry / Special To The Chronicle Show More Show Less

14 of 21 Jacques Pepin, the French chef and host of KQED's "Heart and Soul" cooking show, prepping in the back kitchen before taping at KQED in San Francisco, Calif., Monday, October 13, 2014. Jason Henry / Special To The Chronicle Show More Show Less

16 of 21 Jacques Pepin with granddaughter Shorey Wesen, 10, during filming at KQED of his “Heart & Soul” cooking series. Jason Henry / Special To The Chronicle Show More Show Less

17 of 21 Braised Beef in Red Wine by Jacques Pepin. Craig Lee Show More Show Less

19 of 21 Crab Cakes With Avocado Sauce by Jacques Pepin. Craig Lee Show More Show Less

20 of 21 Braised Beef in Red Wine by Jacques Pepin. Craig Lee Show More Show Less

With a glass of Madeira appropriately in hand, Jacques Pepin leans back in a leather wingback chair beside the kitchen adorned with his own watercolors of fanciful scallions and a whole fish.

This is not his home. But it just as well might be. It&rsquos the set at San Francisco&rsquos KQED, Pepin&rsquos home away from home for a quarter of a century, where almost every single one of his cooking shows has been produced.

On a recent Indian summer afternoon, the Emmy Award-winning chef, James Beard Foundation Lifetime Achievement honoree and French Legion of Honor recipient was filming the introduction to an episode in his latest series, &ldquoJacques Pepin: Heart & Soul.&rdquo It will mark his 14th series, his most personal one &mdash and the final one of his storied career.

As the cameras rolled, Pepin intoned smoothly, &ldquoWhen I was a kid, my mother often gave us a tartine of jam, a thin slice of bread covered with a fruit preserve that she had made. Sometimes it was only a piece of bread and butter. But what bread! What butter! Today, I&rsquom cooking from the heart for my granddaughter, Shorey, on 'Jacques Pepin: Heart & Soul.&rsquo&rdquo

Pepin looked knowingly at the director: &ldquoYou don&rsquot want to do it again?&rdquo he asked with a smile. &ldquoGood.&rdquo

Pepin makes it look that easy &mdash and always has. In this day and age of &ldquoCutthroat Kitchens,&rdquo &ldquoKnife Fights&rdquo and &ldquoCupcake Wars,&rdquo he does the inconceivable: He simply cooks.

He is a throwback to the days when cooking shows actually were about teaching people to cook.

While others on TV are hell-bent on histrionics, throwing down he-man portions of food and boosting bad-boy personas, Pepin&rsquos gentlemanly manners and graceful movements with a knife are enough to leave a roomful of culinary students rapt as he merely bones a chicken. His seminal &ldquoLa Technique&rdquo and &ldquoLa Methode&rdquo cookbooks are modern-day bibles of cooking. And his TV shows are beloved and watched repeatedly, even by veteran chefs, such as Mark Franz of San Francisco&rsquos Farallon, who say the episodes never cease to inspire them.

Although Pepin won&rsquot rule out guest appearances on others&rsquo shows in the future, he says he won&rsquot do another cooking series of his own with a companion cookbook. Why is this most consummate of chefs and teachers ending such a successful, long-running TV career?

&ldquoI do feel older now,&rdquo says Pepin, who will turn 80 in December 2015. &ldquoThe series is work. But the book is even more work.&rdquo

Indeed, it is with Pepin&rsquos decidedly old-school approach. He goes to the market every day and cooks the dishes in his home kitchen while an assistant jots down notes and measurements that are later typed into recipes. Just writing the cookbook can take two years.

It also takes nearly three weeks of filming &mdash two to three episodes a day, with each highlighting four to six recipes &mdash to put together a series. This one will air in fall 2015.

&ldquoHeart & Soul&rdquo will cover Pepin&rsquos 60-plus years in the kitchen: From his apprenticeship as a 13-year-old in France to his stint as personal chef to French President Charles de Gaulle to his moving to New York, where he cooked under the tutelage of Pierre Franey at the famed Le Pavillon and earned a master&rsquos degree in French literature at Columbia University.

His career also includes a decade-long tenure as director of research at Howard Johnson&rsquos, America&rsquos first large restaurant chain, where he cooked sous vide long before it was a thing.

Nowadays, he is both amused and appreciative of how molecular gastronomy has captured the fancy of chefs.

&ldquoMy grandmother used to say, 'Don&rsquot eat anything you don&rsquot recognize,&rsquo&rdquo he says with a chuckle. &ldquoBut that&rsquos what molecular gastronomy is all about. That gets tiring after a while, though. Sometimes you just want a taco and a beer.&rdquo

Pepin decides what goes into each of the 26 half-hour episodes. On this particular episode with 10-year-old granddaughter Shorey Wesen, he is making simple desserts of rhubarb honey compote, chocolate pistachio biscotti, and roasted peaches with creme fraiche and fresh basil. Between takes, Shorey, already a seasoned performer, having appeared on previous Pepin shows, brushes crumbs off her grandfather&rsquos sweater and leans over to give him a peck on the cheek.

Other episodes will feature Pepin cooking with his daughter, Claudine making the favorite dishes of his wife, Gloria, whom he married 48 years ago at a ceremony at Craig Claiborne&rsquos house and reminiscing about Julia Child, his unforgettable sidekick on &ldquoJacques and Julia: Cooking at Home,&rdquo the series in which the two of them often ended up cooking for 100 minutes at a time for a 30-minute episode because they were having too much fun to stop.

Over the years, the Food Network and other stations have wooed him. But Pepin believes in staying loyal, even if it means leaving his home in Connecticut to decamp to San Francisco for nearly a month at a time for filming.

His long-standing relationship with KQED came about thanks to Martin Yan. In the 1980s, Pepin taught cooking classes around the country, including at Yan&rsquos school in Foster City. One day, Yan invited Pepin to accompany him to his &ldquoYan Can Cook&rdquo show, where an executive producer later approached him about doing his own series.

Unlike Child, whose TV exploits were famously satirized by Dan Aykroyd on &ldquoSaturday Night Live&rdquo when she nearly severed her fingertip while chopping with a knife (Pepin&rsquos knife, actually), he&rsquos never cut himself while filming. He&rsquos never gotten the jitters, either &mdash not since producer Susie Heller told him from the get-go to give the camera a name and to talk to it as if it were an old friend.

&ldquoAs long as I was cooking, I was never nervous,&rdquo Pepin says. &ldquoBecause it&rsquos a comfortable place for me to be.&rdquo

That comes across clearly onscreen.

&ldquoHe&rsquos real. He&rsquos not full of himself. What you see in front of the camera is what you get,&rdquo says Franz, who has known Pepin for 40 years. &ldquoHe will be missed on TV. The only good news is that there are a lot of reruns of his shows.&rdquo

As a young chef de partie, Roland Passot of La Folie met Pepin in 1977 at a book signing in Chicago. They forged a bond not only because Passot&rsquos father grew up in the same region of France near Lyon as Pepin, but because Passot revered the elder Frenchman&rsquos achievements that &ldquomade me think anything was possible in America.&rdquo

Over the years, Passot has passed along that admiration to generations of chefs.

&ldquoWhenever a young cook comes to my kitchen at La Folie, I tell them, 'You need a good knife and a good pair of shoes,&rsquo&rdquo Passot says. &ldquoBut most importantly, you need 'La Technique&rsquo and 'La Methode&rsquo by Jacques Pepin.&rdquo

Richard Reddington of Redd in Yountville remembers Passot telling him exactly that when, as an inexperienced cook whose previous gig was selling greeting cards, he showed up at La Folie to ask for a job.

&ldquoRoland made me buy and read those books. And I would make those recipes,&rdquo he says. &ldquoThere really are no better books. You could buy those two books and save 50 grand on cooking school like I did.&rdquo

Pepin&rsquos appeal has endured even as the role of chefs has changed dramatically. When he started cooking in 1949, cooks were at the bottom of the social rung, so much so that the only time a diner ventured into the kitchen was to complain about something.

&ldquoNow, we are geniuses,&rdquo he says. &ldquoI don&rsquot take it too seriously. It&rsquos not brain surgery.&rdquo

Even so, he thinks the elevation of chefs to celebrities is a positive change, and he&rsquos the first to acknowledge he&rsquos benefited from it as much as anyone.

Although he watched the Food Network in its early years, Pepin no longer follows TV cooking shows unless his daughter or a friend is on. His only must-see TV is Anthony Bourdain&rsquos &ldquoParts Unknown.&rdquo

He is on Facebook and Twitter, but it&rsquos Claudine who posts the images and commentary for him. Pepin remains mystified that anyone has time to read all the chatter. As it is, he&rsquos dismayed whenever he sees people at a restaurant looking at their phones rather than each other.

He says it has not been any more emotional for him to film this series, even knowing this is his final one.


Television chef Jacques Pepin recovering from minor stroke

Published March 25. 2015 6:20PM

J.M. HIRSCH, Associated Press

Jacques Pepin, the French chef who helped introduce generations of Americans to refined cuisine, is recovering after suffering a minor stroke.

Pepin, 79, was at his Connecticut home with friends Sunday evening when he began displaying symptoms of a stroke. He received prompt treatment and was released from the hospital Tuesday, his daughter, Claudine Pepin, told The Associated Press. He is expected to make a full recovery.

Pepin canceled an appearance this Friday at the annual International Association of Culinary Professionals conference in Washington, D.C. He'd planned to attend a party in honor of his upcoming 80th birthday, but instead will make a statement via video conference. His daughter says Pepin otherwise is committed to returning to his normal schedule.

"Oh my god, he made soup this morning," she said. "I will do my best to lighten the load, but he's not of the mind to cancel anything. Honestly, he wanted to go to IACP. He's like, 'I'm talking. I can walk. Let's go.'"

Pepin learned to cook as a child in France at his mother's restaurants. He later served as the personal chef to French president Charles De Gaulle, then moved to the United States in 1959 for a job at New York's Le Pavilion, the iconic French restaurant that introduced Americans to fine dining. Pepin later starred in numerous public television cooking series, including several on-air collaborations with Julia Child.

His final public television series — "Jacques Pepin: Heart & Soul — airs this fall, and will be accompanied by a new cookbook, "Jacques Pepin: Heart and Soul in the Kitchen."


Chef Jacques Pépin talks about his new book ‘Quick & Simple,’ how he’s keeping busy amid the pandemic

MADISON, Conn. (WTNH) — The pandemic has many of us trying new recipes in the kitchen, but what has Connecticut’s most famous chef been doing?

When celebrity chef Jacques Pépin cooks at his home in Madison, his daughter often records it for a short Facebook video.

“I did 150, I think, of small four, five, six-minute recipes, showing people what to do with what you have left in your pantry or your refrigerator or freezer,” Pépin said.

Not wasting food is important to Pépin. He will slice off rotten bits of aging vegetables to make his famous “fridge soup.” It is easy recipes like that which make up Pépin’s latest book “Quick & Simple,” which sounds perfect for the pandemic.

“It was just coincidental because we started at least a year and a half ago,” said Pépin.

He said to simplify cooking, it’s okay to treat the store as your personal prep cook.

“So you can use the supermarket the same way,” Pépin said. “You have the boneless, skinless breast of chicken, you have pre-washed spinach, pre-sliced mushrooms.”

While the chef himself is cooking and writing his way through the pandemic, The Jacques Pépin Foundation is helping educate people with addictions and criminal records.

“To teach them the basics of cooking so they can re-integrate into the workforce and start opening a little restaurant or something like that,” said Pépin.

The restaurant business is also largely on pause, however. The man who has been cooking for more than 70 years thinks restaurants will best succeed by keeping things…simple.

“A restricted menu, simpler recipe, fresh, changing every day,” said Pépin.

Chef Pepin said he misses friends and socializing most of all, but at least the chef is still doing what he does best.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


Jacques Pepin

Jacques Pépin is world renowned as the host of his acclaimed and popular cooking programs on public television, and as a prolific author, respected instructor, and gifted artist. Recently, Pépin was awarded the highest honor by the French Government and holds the title of CHEVALIER DE L'ORDRE NATIONAL DE LA LEGION D'HONNEUR. Pépin is the host of many popular public television programs, including his latest series Jacques Pépin: More Fast Food My Way, premiering in October, 2008. Featuring recipes for fast, healthy meals, this will be the twelfth series hosted by Pépin and produced by KQED Public Media in San Francisco. His memoir, The Apprentice: My Life in the Kitchen, was published by Houghton Mifflin in 2003 and in paperback in May, 2004. Pépin’s most recent book, published by Stewart Tabori & Chang in April 2007, is a visual biography, Chez Jacques: Traditions and Rituals of a Cook. He is also a proud grandfather of his daughter Claudine’s first child, Shorey.

Pépin was born in Bourg-en-Bresse, near Lyon. His first exposure to cooking was as a child in his parents' restaurant, Le Pelican. At age thirteen, he began his formal apprenticeship at the distinguished Grand Hotel de L’Europe in his hometown. He subsequently worked in Paris, training under Lucien Diat at the Plaza Athénée. From 1956 to 1958, Pépin was the personal chef to three French heads of state, including Charles de Gaulle.

Moving to the United States in 1959, Pépin worked first at New York's historic Le Pavillon restaurant, then served for ten years as director of research and new development for the Howard Johnson Company, a position that taught him about mass production, marketing, food chemistry, and American food tastes. He studied at Columbia University during this period, ultimately earning an M.A. degree in 18th-century French literature in 1972. In 1997, on the 50th anniversary of the creation of the School of General Studies at Columbia, Pépin was honored with four other distinguished alumni of the School, each representing a different decade in its history.

Pépin shared the spotlight with Julia Child in an earlier PBS-TV series that still is shown occasionally on public television stations. This twenty-two show series, Julia and Jacques Cooking at Home, was the winner of The James Beard Foundation’s Award for Best National Cooking Show—2001, and the duo received a 2001 Daytime Emmy Award from The National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. There is a companion cookbook to the series he did with Child and also to two earlier public television series he co-hosted with his daughter, Jacques Pépin’s Kitchen: Encore with Claudine (1998) and Jacques Pépin’s Kitchen: Cooking with Claudine (1998).

A former columnist for The New York Times, Pépin writes a quarterly column for Food & Wine. He also participates regularly in that magazine’s prestigious Food & Wine Classic in Aspen and at other culinary festivals and fund-raising events worldwide. In addition, he is a popular guest on such commercial TV programs as The Late Show with David Letterman, The Today Show, and Good Morning America.

Pépin is the recipient of three of the French government’s highest honors: he is a Chevalier de L’Ordre National de la Legion d’ Honneur, Chevalier de L’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres (1997) and a Chevalier de L’Ordre du Mérite Agricole (1992). The Dean of Special Programs at The French Culinary Institute (New York), he also is an adjunct faculty member at Boston University. He is a founder of The American Institute of Wine and Food, a member of the International Association of Cooking Professionals, and is on the board of trustees of James Beard Foundation. He and his wife, Gloria, live in Madison, Connecticut.


Jacques Pepin _ who taught Americans fine cuisine _ at home recovering from a minor stroke

Jacques Pepin, the French chef who helped introduce generations of Americans to refined cuisine, is recovering after suffering a minor stroke.
Pepin, 79, was at his Connecticut home with friends Sunday evening when he began displaying symptoms of a stroke. He received prompt treatment and was released from the hospital Tuesday, his daughter, Cl.

This story is part of New Europe's Premium content.

To Read the Full Story, Subscribe or Sign In from the Top of the Page ↑

Privacy Overview

This website uses cookies to improve your experience while you navigate through the website. Out of these cookies, the cookies that are categorized as necessary are stored on your browser as they are essential for the working of basic functionalities of the website. We also use third-party cookies that help us analyze and understand how you use this website. These cookies will be stored in your browser only with your consent. You also have the option to opt-out of these cookies. But opting out of some of these cookies may have an effect on your browsing experience.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience while you navigate through the website. Out of these cookies, the cookies that are categorized as necessary are stored on your browser as they are essential for the working of basic functionalities of the website. We also use third-party cookies that help us analyze and understand how you use this website. These cookies will be stored in your browser only with your consent. You also have the option to opt-out of these cookies. But opting out of some of these cookies may have an effect on your browsing experience.

Necessary cookies are absolutely essential for the website to function properly. This category only includes cookies that ensures basic functionalities and security features of the website. These cookies do not store any personal information.

Any cookies that may not be particularly necessary for the website to function and is used specifically to collect user personal data via analytics, ads, other embedded contents are termed as non-necessary cookies. It is mandatory to procure user consent prior to running these cookies on your website.