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Stranded in the Desert, Hunter Survives for 6 Days by Eating Ants

Stranded in the Desert, Hunter Survives for 6 Days by Eating Ants


Without any other sources of food or water, the stranded hunter ate only ants for six days straight

Authorities conceded that Foggerdy’s survival was incredible given the lack of water during nearly a week in the desert.

Reginald Foggerdy, a 62-year-old hunter who found himself stranded in the Australian desert without food or water, managed to survive his ordeal by eating only ants for six days straight.

Not unlike the California woman who managed to deliver her own baby in a forest and spend three days with a few apples and some water before catching the attention of U.S. Forest Service officials, Foggerdy’s story shows off some of humankind’s most powerful survival skills — and makes a great case for why we should all be eating more bugs. In particular, ants are rich in protein, calcium, and iron.

Foggerdy, who went missing last Wednesday, October 7, was wearing a t-shirt, shorts, and flip-flops when he went into the dessert to hunt animals. On Tuesday, October 13, authorities, with the help of Aboriginal trackers, found the hunter “extremely dehydrated” and “a bit delusional.”

Speaking to a local radio station, police superintendent Andy Greatwood explained that Foggerdy’s “last couple of days of survival were achieved by lying down under a tree and eating black ants. That's the level of survival that Mr. Foggerdy has gone to.”


Survival expert says better planning could have prevented Reginald Foggerdy's six-day desert ordeal

A veteran bush survival expert says a hunter rescued from remote scrub east of Laverton failed to properly prepare for the rough terrain.

Reginald Foggerdy survived for six days eating little more than black ants when he was found by trackers about 170 kilometres east of Laverton.

Currently recovering in Kalgoorlie Hospital from the complications of serious dehydration, the 62-year-old has been joined by members of his family, who flew into Kalgoorlie-Boulder last night.

While he remains too ill to speak, a hospital spokesman said Mr Foggerdy was expected to make a full recovery.

He had become lost and disoriented after leaving his vehicle to chase two camels while on a hunting trip with his brother Ray last week.

Survival expert Bob Cooper said the fact Mr Foggerdy went out wearing thongs, carrying no water and had no emergency equipment indicated he was not ready to deal with the harsh landscape.

"I hesitate to use the word 'lucky', because in my definition, luck is where good planning meets an opportunity," Mr Cooper said.

"With Mr Foggerdy, he wasn't dressed very well, and he took no emergency kit with him if something went wrong.

"He's very fortunate because the police and SES never gave up on him."

But Mr Cooper, who has more than three decades of experience teaching survival skills, said Mr Foggerdy also did a number of things right after becoming stranded.

He said psychology, particularly overcoming initial feelings of panic and hysteria, was always a major factor in survival situations.

While the black ants Mr Foggerdy consumed may not have done much for his health, Mr Cooper said the simple act of finding and consuming food was a major psychological hurdle.

"He needs to be congratulated for not giving up on himself," Mr Cooper said.

"Laying in the shade during the hot part of the day conserves your bodily fluids, because once you start walking in that heat you start to sweat and become dehydrated very quickly.

"And by eating ants, you're doing something to satisfy those priorities — water, warm shelter, signals and food."

Mr Foggerdy's family has described him as an experienced bushman.


Survival expert says better planning could have prevented Reginald Foggerdy's six-day desert ordeal

A veteran bush survival expert says a hunter rescued from remote scrub east of Laverton failed to properly prepare for the rough terrain.

Reginald Foggerdy survived for six days eating little more than black ants when he was found by trackers about 170 kilometres east of Laverton.

Currently recovering in Kalgoorlie Hospital from the complications of serious dehydration, the 62-year-old has been joined by members of his family, who flew into Kalgoorlie-Boulder last night.

While he remains too ill to speak, a hospital spokesman said Mr Foggerdy was expected to make a full recovery.

He had become lost and disoriented after leaving his vehicle to chase two camels while on a hunting trip with his brother Ray last week.

Survival expert Bob Cooper said the fact Mr Foggerdy went out wearing thongs, carrying no water and had no emergency equipment indicated he was not ready to deal with the harsh landscape.

"I hesitate to use the word 'lucky', because in my definition, luck is where good planning meets an opportunity," Mr Cooper said.

"With Mr Foggerdy, he wasn't dressed very well, and he took no emergency kit with him if something went wrong.

"He's very fortunate because the police and SES never gave up on him."

But Mr Cooper, who has more than three decades of experience teaching survival skills, said Mr Foggerdy also did a number of things right after becoming stranded.

He said psychology, particularly overcoming initial feelings of panic and hysteria, was always a major factor in survival situations.

While the black ants Mr Foggerdy consumed may not have done much for his health, Mr Cooper said the simple act of finding and consuming food was a major psychological hurdle.

"He needs to be congratulated for not giving up on himself," Mr Cooper said.

"Laying in the shade during the hot part of the day conserves your bodily fluids, because once you start walking in that heat you start to sweat and become dehydrated very quickly.

"And by eating ants, you're doing something to satisfy those priorities — water, warm shelter, signals and food."

Mr Foggerdy's family has described him as an experienced bushman.


Survival expert says better planning could have prevented Reginald Foggerdy's six-day desert ordeal

A veteran bush survival expert says a hunter rescued from remote scrub east of Laverton failed to properly prepare for the rough terrain.

Reginald Foggerdy survived for six days eating little more than black ants when he was found by trackers about 170 kilometres east of Laverton.

Currently recovering in Kalgoorlie Hospital from the complications of serious dehydration, the 62-year-old has been joined by members of his family, who flew into Kalgoorlie-Boulder last night.

While he remains too ill to speak, a hospital spokesman said Mr Foggerdy was expected to make a full recovery.

He had become lost and disoriented after leaving his vehicle to chase two camels while on a hunting trip with his brother Ray last week.

Survival expert Bob Cooper said the fact Mr Foggerdy went out wearing thongs, carrying no water and had no emergency equipment indicated he was not ready to deal with the harsh landscape.

"I hesitate to use the word 'lucky', because in my definition, luck is where good planning meets an opportunity," Mr Cooper said.

"With Mr Foggerdy, he wasn't dressed very well, and he took no emergency kit with him if something went wrong.

"He's very fortunate because the police and SES never gave up on him."

But Mr Cooper, who has more than three decades of experience teaching survival skills, said Mr Foggerdy also did a number of things right after becoming stranded.

He said psychology, particularly overcoming initial feelings of panic and hysteria, was always a major factor in survival situations.

While the black ants Mr Foggerdy consumed may not have done much for his health, Mr Cooper said the simple act of finding and consuming food was a major psychological hurdle.

"He needs to be congratulated for not giving up on himself," Mr Cooper said.

"Laying in the shade during the hot part of the day conserves your bodily fluids, because once you start walking in that heat you start to sweat and become dehydrated very quickly.

"And by eating ants, you're doing something to satisfy those priorities — water, warm shelter, signals and food."

Mr Foggerdy's family has described him as an experienced bushman.


Survival expert says better planning could have prevented Reginald Foggerdy's six-day desert ordeal

A veteran bush survival expert says a hunter rescued from remote scrub east of Laverton failed to properly prepare for the rough terrain.

Reginald Foggerdy survived for six days eating little more than black ants when he was found by trackers about 170 kilometres east of Laverton.

Currently recovering in Kalgoorlie Hospital from the complications of serious dehydration, the 62-year-old has been joined by members of his family, who flew into Kalgoorlie-Boulder last night.

While he remains too ill to speak, a hospital spokesman said Mr Foggerdy was expected to make a full recovery.

He had become lost and disoriented after leaving his vehicle to chase two camels while on a hunting trip with his brother Ray last week.

Survival expert Bob Cooper said the fact Mr Foggerdy went out wearing thongs, carrying no water and had no emergency equipment indicated he was not ready to deal with the harsh landscape.

"I hesitate to use the word 'lucky', because in my definition, luck is where good planning meets an opportunity," Mr Cooper said.

"With Mr Foggerdy, he wasn't dressed very well, and he took no emergency kit with him if something went wrong.

"He's very fortunate because the police and SES never gave up on him."

But Mr Cooper, who has more than three decades of experience teaching survival skills, said Mr Foggerdy also did a number of things right after becoming stranded.

He said psychology, particularly overcoming initial feelings of panic and hysteria, was always a major factor in survival situations.

While the black ants Mr Foggerdy consumed may not have done much for his health, Mr Cooper said the simple act of finding and consuming food was a major psychological hurdle.

"He needs to be congratulated for not giving up on himself," Mr Cooper said.

"Laying in the shade during the hot part of the day conserves your bodily fluids, because once you start walking in that heat you start to sweat and become dehydrated very quickly.

"And by eating ants, you're doing something to satisfy those priorities — water, warm shelter, signals and food."

Mr Foggerdy's family has described him as an experienced bushman.


Survival expert says better planning could have prevented Reginald Foggerdy's six-day desert ordeal

A veteran bush survival expert says a hunter rescued from remote scrub east of Laverton failed to properly prepare for the rough terrain.

Reginald Foggerdy survived for six days eating little more than black ants when he was found by trackers about 170 kilometres east of Laverton.

Currently recovering in Kalgoorlie Hospital from the complications of serious dehydration, the 62-year-old has been joined by members of his family, who flew into Kalgoorlie-Boulder last night.

While he remains too ill to speak, a hospital spokesman said Mr Foggerdy was expected to make a full recovery.

He had become lost and disoriented after leaving his vehicle to chase two camels while on a hunting trip with his brother Ray last week.

Survival expert Bob Cooper said the fact Mr Foggerdy went out wearing thongs, carrying no water and had no emergency equipment indicated he was not ready to deal with the harsh landscape.

"I hesitate to use the word 'lucky', because in my definition, luck is where good planning meets an opportunity," Mr Cooper said.

"With Mr Foggerdy, he wasn't dressed very well, and he took no emergency kit with him if something went wrong.

"He's very fortunate because the police and SES never gave up on him."

But Mr Cooper, who has more than three decades of experience teaching survival skills, said Mr Foggerdy also did a number of things right after becoming stranded.

He said psychology, particularly overcoming initial feelings of panic and hysteria, was always a major factor in survival situations.

While the black ants Mr Foggerdy consumed may not have done much for his health, Mr Cooper said the simple act of finding and consuming food was a major psychological hurdle.

"He needs to be congratulated for not giving up on himself," Mr Cooper said.

"Laying in the shade during the hot part of the day conserves your bodily fluids, because once you start walking in that heat you start to sweat and become dehydrated very quickly.

"And by eating ants, you're doing something to satisfy those priorities — water, warm shelter, signals and food."

Mr Foggerdy's family has described him as an experienced bushman.


Survival expert says better planning could have prevented Reginald Foggerdy's six-day desert ordeal

A veteran bush survival expert says a hunter rescued from remote scrub east of Laverton failed to properly prepare for the rough terrain.

Reginald Foggerdy survived for six days eating little more than black ants when he was found by trackers about 170 kilometres east of Laverton.

Currently recovering in Kalgoorlie Hospital from the complications of serious dehydration, the 62-year-old has been joined by members of his family, who flew into Kalgoorlie-Boulder last night.

While he remains too ill to speak, a hospital spokesman said Mr Foggerdy was expected to make a full recovery.

He had become lost and disoriented after leaving his vehicle to chase two camels while on a hunting trip with his brother Ray last week.

Survival expert Bob Cooper said the fact Mr Foggerdy went out wearing thongs, carrying no water and had no emergency equipment indicated he was not ready to deal with the harsh landscape.

"I hesitate to use the word 'lucky', because in my definition, luck is where good planning meets an opportunity," Mr Cooper said.

"With Mr Foggerdy, he wasn't dressed very well, and he took no emergency kit with him if something went wrong.

"He's very fortunate because the police and SES never gave up on him."

But Mr Cooper, who has more than three decades of experience teaching survival skills, said Mr Foggerdy also did a number of things right after becoming stranded.

He said psychology, particularly overcoming initial feelings of panic and hysteria, was always a major factor in survival situations.

While the black ants Mr Foggerdy consumed may not have done much for his health, Mr Cooper said the simple act of finding and consuming food was a major psychological hurdle.

"He needs to be congratulated for not giving up on himself," Mr Cooper said.

"Laying in the shade during the hot part of the day conserves your bodily fluids, because once you start walking in that heat you start to sweat and become dehydrated very quickly.

"And by eating ants, you're doing something to satisfy those priorities — water, warm shelter, signals and food."

Mr Foggerdy's family has described him as an experienced bushman.


Survival expert says better planning could have prevented Reginald Foggerdy's six-day desert ordeal

A veteran bush survival expert says a hunter rescued from remote scrub east of Laverton failed to properly prepare for the rough terrain.

Reginald Foggerdy survived for six days eating little more than black ants when he was found by trackers about 170 kilometres east of Laverton.

Currently recovering in Kalgoorlie Hospital from the complications of serious dehydration, the 62-year-old has been joined by members of his family, who flew into Kalgoorlie-Boulder last night.

While he remains too ill to speak, a hospital spokesman said Mr Foggerdy was expected to make a full recovery.

He had become lost and disoriented after leaving his vehicle to chase two camels while on a hunting trip with his brother Ray last week.

Survival expert Bob Cooper said the fact Mr Foggerdy went out wearing thongs, carrying no water and had no emergency equipment indicated he was not ready to deal with the harsh landscape.

"I hesitate to use the word 'lucky', because in my definition, luck is where good planning meets an opportunity," Mr Cooper said.

"With Mr Foggerdy, he wasn't dressed very well, and he took no emergency kit with him if something went wrong.

"He's very fortunate because the police and SES never gave up on him."

But Mr Cooper, who has more than three decades of experience teaching survival skills, said Mr Foggerdy also did a number of things right after becoming stranded.

He said psychology, particularly overcoming initial feelings of panic and hysteria, was always a major factor in survival situations.

While the black ants Mr Foggerdy consumed may not have done much for his health, Mr Cooper said the simple act of finding and consuming food was a major psychological hurdle.

"He needs to be congratulated for not giving up on himself," Mr Cooper said.

"Laying in the shade during the hot part of the day conserves your bodily fluids, because once you start walking in that heat you start to sweat and become dehydrated very quickly.

"And by eating ants, you're doing something to satisfy those priorities — water, warm shelter, signals and food."

Mr Foggerdy's family has described him as an experienced bushman.


Survival expert says better planning could have prevented Reginald Foggerdy's six-day desert ordeal

A veteran bush survival expert says a hunter rescued from remote scrub east of Laverton failed to properly prepare for the rough terrain.

Reginald Foggerdy survived for six days eating little more than black ants when he was found by trackers about 170 kilometres east of Laverton.

Currently recovering in Kalgoorlie Hospital from the complications of serious dehydration, the 62-year-old has been joined by members of his family, who flew into Kalgoorlie-Boulder last night.

While he remains too ill to speak, a hospital spokesman said Mr Foggerdy was expected to make a full recovery.

He had become lost and disoriented after leaving his vehicle to chase two camels while on a hunting trip with his brother Ray last week.

Survival expert Bob Cooper said the fact Mr Foggerdy went out wearing thongs, carrying no water and had no emergency equipment indicated he was not ready to deal with the harsh landscape.

"I hesitate to use the word 'lucky', because in my definition, luck is where good planning meets an opportunity," Mr Cooper said.

"With Mr Foggerdy, he wasn't dressed very well, and he took no emergency kit with him if something went wrong.

"He's very fortunate because the police and SES never gave up on him."

But Mr Cooper, who has more than three decades of experience teaching survival skills, said Mr Foggerdy also did a number of things right after becoming stranded.

He said psychology, particularly overcoming initial feelings of panic and hysteria, was always a major factor in survival situations.

While the black ants Mr Foggerdy consumed may not have done much for his health, Mr Cooper said the simple act of finding and consuming food was a major psychological hurdle.

"He needs to be congratulated for not giving up on himself," Mr Cooper said.

"Laying in the shade during the hot part of the day conserves your bodily fluids, because once you start walking in that heat you start to sweat and become dehydrated very quickly.

"And by eating ants, you're doing something to satisfy those priorities — water, warm shelter, signals and food."

Mr Foggerdy's family has described him as an experienced bushman.


Survival expert says better planning could have prevented Reginald Foggerdy's six-day desert ordeal

A veteran bush survival expert says a hunter rescued from remote scrub east of Laverton failed to properly prepare for the rough terrain.

Reginald Foggerdy survived for six days eating little more than black ants when he was found by trackers about 170 kilometres east of Laverton.

Currently recovering in Kalgoorlie Hospital from the complications of serious dehydration, the 62-year-old has been joined by members of his family, who flew into Kalgoorlie-Boulder last night.

While he remains too ill to speak, a hospital spokesman said Mr Foggerdy was expected to make a full recovery.

He had become lost and disoriented after leaving his vehicle to chase two camels while on a hunting trip with his brother Ray last week.

Survival expert Bob Cooper said the fact Mr Foggerdy went out wearing thongs, carrying no water and had no emergency equipment indicated he was not ready to deal with the harsh landscape.

"I hesitate to use the word 'lucky', because in my definition, luck is where good planning meets an opportunity," Mr Cooper said.

"With Mr Foggerdy, he wasn't dressed very well, and he took no emergency kit with him if something went wrong.

"He's very fortunate because the police and SES never gave up on him."

But Mr Cooper, who has more than three decades of experience teaching survival skills, said Mr Foggerdy also did a number of things right after becoming stranded.

He said psychology, particularly overcoming initial feelings of panic and hysteria, was always a major factor in survival situations.

While the black ants Mr Foggerdy consumed may not have done much for his health, Mr Cooper said the simple act of finding and consuming food was a major psychological hurdle.

"He needs to be congratulated for not giving up on himself," Mr Cooper said.

"Laying in the shade during the hot part of the day conserves your bodily fluids, because once you start walking in that heat you start to sweat and become dehydrated very quickly.

"And by eating ants, you're doing something to satisfy those priorities — water, warm shelter, signals and food."

Mr Foggerdy's family has described him as an experienced bushman.


Survival expert says better planning could have prevented Reginald Foggerdy's six-day desert ordeal

A veteran bush survival expert says a hunter rescued from remote scrub east of Laverton failed to properly prepare for the rough terrain.

Reginald Foggerdy survived for six days eating little more than black ants when he was found by trackers about 170 kilometres east of Laverton.

Currently recovering in Kalgoorlie Hospital from the complications of serious dehydration, the 62-year-old has been joined by members of his family, who flew into Kalgoorlie-Boulder last night.

While he remains too ill to speak, a hospital spokesman said Mr Foggerdy was expected to make a full recovery.

He had become lost and disoriented after leaving his vehicle to chase two camels while on a hunting trip with his brother Ray last week.

Survival expert Bob Cooper said the fact Mr Foggerdy went out wearing thongs, carrying no water and had no emergency equipment indicated he was not ready to deal with the harsh landscape.

"I hesitate to use the word 'lucky', because in my definition, luck is where good planning meets an opportunity," Mr Cooper said.

"With Mr Foggerdy, he wasn't dressed very well, and he took no emergency kit with him if something went wrong.

"He's very fortunate because the police and SES never gave up on him."

But Mr Cooper, who has more than three decades of experience teaching survival skills, said Mr Foggerdy also did a number of things right after becoming stranded.

He said psychology, particularly overcoming initial feelings of panic and hysteria, was always a major factor in survival situations.

While the black ants Mr Foggerdy consumed may not have done much for his health, Mr Cooper said the simple act of finding and consuming food was a major psychological hurdle.

"He needs to be congratulated for not giving up on himself," Mr Cooper said.

"Laying in the shade during the hot part of the day conserves your bodily fluids, because once you start walking in that heat you start to sweat and become dehydrated very quickly.

"And by eating ants, you're doing something to satisfy those priorities — water, warm shelter, signals and food."

Mr Foggerdy's family has described him as an experienced bushman.