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This Person’s Strawberry Pizza Outraged the Internet

This Person’s Strawberry Pizza Outraged the Internet


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This person took fruit-topped pizza to a whole new level

anilakkus / istockphoto.com

Forget pineapples on pizza — we’re going to have to put that debate on hold. There’s a new contender in town for world’s worst pizza, and I’m sad to say it’s covered in strawberries.

On October 29, @MoonEmojiii posted a photo of the disaster to Twitter, just in time to scare everyone on Halloween. The caption reads: “strawberries >> pineapples.”

“The police are on their way, I hope it was worth it,” @Blaker212 wrote. Arrest this pie!

The police are on their way, I hope it was worth it.

— Hunter Blake (@Blaker212) October 29, 2017

“Why stop there tho?? Put apples and grapes on there. Hell even try grapefruit. They pair those fruits with cheese all the time!” @whorligram exclaimed.

“I just threw up a little in my mouth,” @MakeupForWOC confessed. We did too, girl.

“Pineapple and non-pineapple pizza eaters must put our differences aside and join forces to defeat this evil,” @lebaenesepapi offered. His response garnered over 372,000 likes.

People are genuinely upset and concerned about this demonic pie. The original poster is begging people to “stop reporting me to the @FBI” and even offered up one of the most iconic GIFs of 2007 — a crying shot of Chris Crocker in a blonde bob mid-yell during his most popular skit, “Leave Britney Alone!”

I think one thing here is clear: Strawberries do not belong on pizza. But, we won’t knock it until we try it (which we probably won’t). For the details on drool-worthy pies around the nation, check out the best pizza in every state.


Pizza Babka

The marriage of the two best uses for yeast in the history of mankind. Babka dough paired with pizza toppings.

We’re going savory for this month’s Babka of the Month, and I have zero regrets. None. Step aside, chocolate babka — pizza babka is the true winner.

I’m not going to claim to be original here pizza babka is a thing. There are several other recipes on the internet. But I was surprised to find that they all use pizza dough as the base (or in one case, challah dough). I’d call those a babka-shaped pizza loaf. But if we’re talking about pizza babka, shouldn’t we use… babka dough?

What is Babka Dough?

I answered this briefly in my chocolate babka recipe which kicked off this whole babka endeavor. But in short, classic babka dough is rich with eggs, milk, and butter.

My babka dough recipe (which makes two loaves) contains 1 cup of milk, 2 eggs, and 12 tablespoons of butter. I looked at zillion different pizza dough recipes in comparison (like Food Network’s Giada de Laurentiis recipe, King Arthur Flour recipe, and Bon Appetit’s recipe), and none contain any milk, eggs, or butter whatsoever.

In other words, pizza dough ≠ babka dough. We’re going to make a REAL babka pizza today, friends!

How to Make Babka Pizza Dough

I wanted to keep the rich, eggy, buttery dough base that we know and love as babka, but since we’re going savory, we don’t need the bread to be sweet. To achieve this, I cut out some of the sugar from my original babka dough recipe and doubled the salt (and added garlic powder because everything is better with garlic).

Why include sugar at all? Does yeast actually need sugar to work? It’s time for my favorite subject: kitchen chemistry!

Kitchen Chemistry

There’s a common misconception that yeast needs to feed on sugar. This is totally false — yeast can thrive just fine on flour. (In fact, those pizza dough recipes I included above? Two of them do not include any sugar at all.) So why are we adding it to this dough? Sugar acts as a tenderizer, creating a fine crumb in baked goods. We want this babka to retain the bread-like properties, so keeping some sugar in the dough keeps it soft and crumby. Sugar also promotes browning — we don’t need this in a pizza since it’s cooked at such high temperature. For baking at lower temepratures, however, sugar helps crusts turn brown. By adding sugar to the dough, the babka will darken while it cooks, giving a visual appearance like a pizza cooked at a high temperature.

Babka Pizza Toppings

We went classic with our pizza toppings: some grated Pecorino Romano, tomato sauce, pepperoni (by request of my 3 year old), and shredded mozzarella cheese. The key here is to go minimal with the fillings: this isn’t a loaded pizza! Everything needs to roll up neatly into a log.

You can certainly substitute with any of your favorite pizza toppings. Make sure nothing is too wet or it won’t bake well (so dry those olives with a paper towel first!) and that any raw vegetables are cooked. Because they’re tucked inside the babka, they won’t be exposed to high heat like they are on a pizza.

Need a refresher on how to roll a babka into a nice long loaf? I have detailed pictures on both my best chocolate babka recipe and cinnamon hazelnut babka recipe!

How to Store Pizza Babka

Because this contains tomato sauce and cheese, you’ll want to refrigerate your pizza babka leftovers (if you have any!). Wrap tightly in foil or store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Pizza babka reheats well in a 350 °F oven for 5-10 minutes, or can be cooked over medium heat in a non-stick skillet until warmed through. Buuuuut I actually wound up loving it cold. I expected it would be better reheated, but straight out of the fridge a few days later was absolutely delicious!

Pizza Babka Tips and Tricks

  1. Refrigerate the dough for the second hour of the first rise. When the dough is cold, it rolls out beautifully and with no real need to add excess flour.
  2. Use a thicker tomato sauce as a topping. If your sauce is too thin, reduce it on the stove for 15 – 20 minutes.
  3. Cook and dry any vegetables before adding as a topping. Ensure everything is cooled – adding warm toppings to the dough will start to melt the butter in the dough.
  4. Refrigerate the rolled babka before slicing. This will help minimize tomato sauce and other toppings spilling out when the dough roll is sliced in half.
  5. Brush the babka dough with olive oil and sprinkle with some additional Pecorino Romano, garlic powder, and Italian herbs before baking. This creates a delicious outside crust.
  6. Use a thermometer to determine if the babka is done. Babka bread is thick, and when it’s full of tomato sauce and melty cheese, it can be hard to use a tester to determine if the center of the loaf is fully cooked. Take out the guess work and use an instant-read thermometer: when the center of the loaf hits 190 °F, it’s done!
  7. Allow the babka to cool for at least 30 minutes before slicing. I know, it’s tempting to want to dig right in as soon as it comes out of the oven! But let it cool in the pan for 15 minutes and then on a wire rack for an additional 15 minutes to ensure it will slice neatly.

Real talk: this is one of my most favorite things I’ve ever made, and I’ve made a lot of things in my kitchen. I will always take savory over sweet, and I firmly believe that carbs + cheese is the ultimate match made in heaven. Yes, this is a little more hands-on than typical pizza, but it is so, so very worth it. Trust me.


Pizza Babka

The marriage of the two best uses for yeast in the history of mankind. Babka dough paired with pizza toppings.

We’re going savory for this month’s Babka of the Month, and I have zero regrets. None. Step aside, chocolate babka — pizza babka is the true winner.

I’m not going to claim to be original here pizza babka is a thing. There are several other recipes on the internet. But I was surprised to find that they all use pizza dough as the base (or in one case, challah dough). I’d call those a babka-shaped pizza loaf. But if we’re talking about pizza babka, shouldn’t we use… babka dough?

What is Babka Dough?

I answered this briefly in my chocolate babka recipe which kicked off this whole babka endeavor. But in short, classic babka dough is rich with eggs, milk, and butter.

My babka dough recipe (which makes two loaves) contains 1 cup of milk, 2 eggs, and 12 tablespoons of butter. I looked at zillion different pizza dough recipes in comparison (like Food Network’s Giada de Laurentiis recipe, King Arthur Flour recipe, and Bon Appetit’s recipe), and none contain any milk, eggs, or butter whatsoever.

In other words, pizza dough ≠ babka dough. We’re going to make a REAL babka pizza today, friends!

How to Make Babka Pizza Dough

I wanted to keep the rich, eggy, buttery dough base that we know and love as babka, but since we’re going savory, we don’t need the bread to be sweet. To achieve this, I cut out some of the sugar from my original babka dough recipe and doubled the salt (and added garlic powder because everything is better with garlic).

Why include sugar at all? Does yeast actually need sugar to work? It’s time for my favorite subject: kitchen chemistry!

Kitchen Chemistry

There’s a common misconception that yeast needs to feed on sugar. This is totally false — yeast can thrive just fine on flour. (In fact, those pizza dough recipes I included above? Two of them do not include any sugar at all.) So why are we adding it to this dough? Sugar acts as a tenderizer, creating a fine crumb in baked goods. We want this babka to retain the bread-like properties, so keeping some sugar in the dough keeps it soft and crumby. Sugar also promotes browning — we don’t need this in a pizza since it’s cooked at such high temperature. For baking at lower temepratures, however, sugar helps crusts turn brown. By adding sugar to the dough, the babka will darken while it cooks, giving a visual appearance like a pizza cooked at a high temperature.

Babka Pizza Toppings

We went classic with our pizza toppings: some grated Pecorino Romano, tomato sauce, pepperoni (by request of my 3 year old), and shredded mozzarella cheese. The key here is to go minimal with the fillings: this isn’t a loaded pizza! Everything needs to roll up neatly into a log.

You can certainly substitute with any of your favorite pizza toppings. Make sure nothing is too wet or it won’t bake well (so dry those olives with a paper towel first!) and that any raw vegetables are cooked. Because they’re tucked inside the babka, they won’t be exposed to high heat like they are on a pizza.

Need a refresher on how to roll a babka into a nice long loaf? I have detailed pictures on both my best chocolate babka recipe and cinnamon hazelnut babka recipe!

How to Store Pizza Babka

Because this contains tomato sauce and cheese, you’ll want to refrigerate your pizza babka leftovers (if you have any!). Wrap tightly in foil or store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Pizza babka reheats well in a 350 °F oven for 5-10 minutes, or can be cooked over medium heat in a non-stick skillet until warmed through. Buuuuut I actually wound up loving it cold. I expected it would be better reheated, but straight out of the fridge a few days later was absolutely delicious!

Pizza Babka Tips and Tricks

  1. Refrigerate the dough for the second hour of the first rise. When the dough is cold, it rolls out beautifully and with no real need to add excess flour.
  2. Use a thicker tomato sauce as a topping. If your sauce is too thin, reduce it on the stove for 15 – 20 minutes.
  3. Cook and dry any vegetables before adding as a topping. Ensure everything is cooled – adding warm toppings to the dough will start to melt the butter in the dough.
  4. Refrigerate the rolled babka before slicing. This will help minimize tomato sauce and other toppings spilling out when the dough roll is sliced in half.
  5. Brush the babka dough with olive oil and sprinkle with some additional Pecorino Romano, garlic powder, and Italian herbs before baking. This creates a delicious outside crust.
  6. Use a thermometer to determine if the babka is done. Babka bread is thick, and when it’s full of tomato sauce and melty cheese, it can be hard to use a tester to determine if the center of the loaf is fully cooked. Take out the guess work and use an instant-read thermometer: when the center of the loaf hits 190 °F, it’s done!
  7. Allow the babka to cool for at least 30 minutes before slicing. I know, it’s tempting to want to dig right in as soon as it comes out of the oven! But let it cool in the pan for 15 minutes and then on a wire rack for an additional 15 minutes to ensure it will slice neatly.

Real talk: this is one of my most favorite things I’ve ever made, and I’ve made a lot of things in my kitchen. I will always take savory over sweet, and I firmly believe that carbs + cheese is the ultimate match made in heaven. Yes, this is a little more hands-on than typical pizza, but it is so, so very worth it. Trust me.


Pizza Babka

The marriage of the two best uses for yeast in the history of mankind. Babka dough paired with pizza toppings.

We’re going savory for this month’s Babka of the Month, and I have zero regrets. None. Step aside, chocolate babka — pizza babka is the true winner.

I’m not going to claim to be original here pizza babka is a thing. There are several other recipes on the internet. But I was surprised to find that they all use pizza dough as the base (or in one case, challah dough). I’d call those a babka-shaped pizza loaf. But if we’re talking about pizza babka, shouldn’t we use… babka dough?

What is Babka Dough?

I answered this briefly in my chocolate babka recipe which kicked off this whole babka endeavor. But in short, classic babka dough is rich with eggs, milk, and butter.

My babka dough recipe (which makes two loaves) contains 1 cup of milk, 2 eggs, and 12 tablespoons of butter. I looked at zillion different pizza dough recipes in comparison (like Food Network’s Giada de Laurentiis recipe, King Arthur Flour recipe, and Bon Appetit’s recipe), and none contain any milk, eggs, or butter whatsoever.

In other words, pizza dough ≠ babka dough. We’re going to make a REAL babka pizza today, friends!

How to Make Babka Pizza Dough

I wanted to keep the rich, eggy, buttery dough base that we know and love as babka, but since we’re going savory, we don’t need the bread to be sweet. To achieve this, I cut out some of the sugar from my original babka dough recipe and doubled the salt (and added garlic powder because everything is better with garlic).

Why include sugar at all? Does yeast actually need sugar to work? It’s time for my favorite subject: kitchen chemistry!

Kitchen Chemistry

There’s a common misconception that yeast needs to feed on sugar. This is totally false — yeast can thrive just fine on flour. (In fact, those pizza dough recipes I included above? Two of them do not include any sugar at all.) So why are we adding it to this dough? Sugar acts as a tenderizer, creating a fine crumb in baked goods. We want this babka to retain the bread-like properties, so keeping some sugar in the dough keeps it soft and crumby. Sugar also promotes browning — we don’t need this in a pizza since it’s cooked at such high temperature. For baking at lower temepratures, however, sugar helps crusts turn brown. By adding sugar to the dough, the babka will darken while it cooks, giving a visual appearance like a pizza cooked at a high temperature.

Babka Pizza Toppings

We went classic with our pizza toppings: some grated Pecorino Romano, tomato sauce, pepperoni (by request of my 3 year old), and shredded mozzarella cheese. The key here is to go minimal with the fillings: this isn’t a loaded pizza! Everything needs to roll up neatly into a log.

You can certainly substitute with any of your favorite pizza toppings. Make sure nothing is too wet or it won’t bake well (so dry those olives with a paper towel first!) and that any raw vegetables are cooked. Because they’re tucked inside the babka, they won’t be exposed to high heat like they are on a pizza.

Need a refresher on how to roll a babka into a nice long loaf? I have detailed pictures on both my best chocolate babka recipe and cinnamon hazelnut babka recipe!

How to Store Pizza Babka

Because this contains tomato sauce and cheese, you’ll want to refrigerate your pizza babka leftovers (if you have any!). Wrap tightly in foil or store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Pizza babka reheats well in a 350 °F oven for 5-10 minutes, or can be cooked over medium heat in a non-stick skillet until warmed through. Buuuuut I actually wound up loving it cold. I expected it would be better reheated, but straight out of the fridge a few days later was absolutely delicious!

Pizza Babka Tips and Tricks

  1. Refrigerate the dough for the second hour of the first rise. When the dough is cold, it rolls out beautifully and with no real need to add excess flour.
  2. Use a thicker tomato sauce as a topping. If your sauce is too thin, reduce it on the stove for 15 – 20 minutes.
  3. Cook and dry any vegetables before adding as a topping. Ensure everything is cooled – adding warm toppings to the dough will start to melt the butter in the dough.
  4. Refrigerate the rolled babka before slicing. This will help minimize tomato sauce and other toppings spilling out when the dough roll is sliced in half.
  5. Brush the babka dough with olive oil and sprinkle with some additional Pecorino Romano, garlic powder, and Italian herbs before baking. This creates a delicious outside crust.
  6. Use a thermometer to determine if the babka is done. Babka bread is thick, and when it’s full of tomato sauce and melty cheese, it can be hard to use a tester to determine if the center of the loaf is fully cooked. Take out the guess work and use an instant-read thermometer: when the center of the loaf hits 190 °F, it’s done!
  7. Allow the babka to cool for at least 30 minutes before slicing. I know, it’s tempting to want to dig right in as soon as it comes out of the oven! But let it cool in the pan for 15 minutes and then on a wire rack for an additional 15 minutes to ensure it will slice neatly.

Real talk: this is one of my most favorite things I’ve ever made, and I’ve made a lot of things in my kitchen. I will always take savory over sweet, and I firmly believe that carbs + cheese is the ultimate match made in heaven. Yes, this is a little more hands-on than typical pizza, but it is so, so very worth it. Trust me.


Pizza Babka

The marriage of the two best uses for yeast in the history of mankind. Babka dough paired with pizza toppings.

We’re going savory for this month’s Babka of the Month, and I have zero regrets. None. Step aside, chocolate babka — pizza babka is the true winner.

I’m not going to claim to be original here pizza babka is a thing. There are several other recipes on the internet. But I was surprised to find that they all use pizza dough as the base (or in one case, challah dough). I’d call those a babka-shaped pizza loaf. But if we’re talking about pizza babka, shouldn’t we use… babka dough?

What is Babka Dough?

I answered this briefly in my chocolate babka recipe which kicked off this whole babka endeavor. But in short, classic babka dough is rich with eggs, milk, and butter.

My babka dough recipe (which makes two loaves) contains 1 cup of milk, 2 eggs, and 12 tablespoons of butter. I looked at zillion different pizza dough recipes in comparison (like Food Network’s Giada de Laurentiis recipe, King Arthur Flour recipe, and Bon Appetit’s recipe), and none contain any milk, eggs, or butter whatsoever.

In other words, pizza dough ≠ babka dough. We’re going to make a REAL babka pizza today, friends!

How to Make Babka Pizza Dough

I wanted to keep the rich, eggy, buttery dough base that we know and love as babka, but since we’re going savory, we don’t need the bread to be sweet. To achieve this, I cut out some of the sugar from my original babka dough recipe and doubled the salt (and added garlic powder because everything is better with garlic).

Why include sugar at all? Does yeast actually need sugar to work? It’s time for my favorite subject: kitchen chemistry!

Kitchen Chemistry

There’s a common misconception that yeast needs to feed on sugar. This is totally false — yeast can thrive just fine on flour. (In fact, those pizza dough recipes I included above? Two of them do not include any sugar at all.) So why are we adding it to this dough? Sugar acts as a tenderizer, creating a fine crumb in baked goods. We want this babka to retain the bread-like properties, so keeping some sugar in the dough keeps it soft and crumby. Sugar also promotes browning — we don’t need this in a pizza since it’s cooked at such high temperature. For baking at lower temepratures, however, sugar helps crusts turn brown. By adding sugar to the dough, the babka will darken while it cooks, giving a visual appearance like a pizza cooked at a high temperature.

Babka Pizza Toppings

We went classic with our pizza toppings: some grated Pecorino Romano, tomato sauce, pepperoni (by request of my 3 year old), and shredded mozzarella cheese. The key here is to go minimal with the fillings: this isn’t a loaded pizza! Everything needs to roll up neatly into a log.

You can certainly substitute with any of your favorite pizza toppings. Make sure nothing is too wet or it won’t bake well (so dry those olives with a paper towel first!) and that any raw vegetables are cooked. Because they’re tucked inside the babka, they won’t be exposed to high heat like they are on a pizza.

Need a refresher on how to roll a babka into a nice long loaf? I have detailed pictures on both my best chocolate babka recipe and cinnamon hazelnut babka recipe!

How to Store Pizza Babka

Because this contains tomato sauce and cheese, you’ll want to refrigerate your pizza babka leftovers (if you have any!). Wrap tightly in foil or store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Pizza babka reheats well in a 350 °F oven for 5-10 minutes, or can be cooked over medium heat in a non-stick skillet until warmed through. Buuuuut I actually wound up loving it cold. I expected it would be better reheated, but straight out of the fridge a few days later was absolutely delicious!

Pizza Babka Tips and Tricks

  1. Refrigerate the dough for the second hour of the first rise. When the dough is cold, it rolls out beautifully and with no real need to add excess flour.
  2. Use a thicker tomato sauce as a topping. If your sauce is too thin, reduce it on the stove for 15 – 20 minutes.
  3. Cook and dry any vegetables before adding as a topping. Ensure everything is cooled – adding warm toppings to the dough will start to melt the butter in the dough.
  4. Refrigerate the rolled babka before slicing. This will help minimize tomato sauce and other toppings spilling out when the dough roll is sliced in half.
  5. Brush the babka dough with olive oil and sprinkle with some additional Pecorino Romano, garlic powder, and Italian herbs before baking. This creates a delicious outside crust.
  6. Use a thermometer to determine if the babka is done. Babka bread is thick, and when it’s full of tomato sauce and melty cheese, it can be hard to use a tester to determine if the center of the loaf is fully cooked. Take out the guess work and use an instant-read thermometer: when the center of the loaf hits 190 °F, it’s done!
  7. Allow the babka to cool for at least 30 minutes before slicing. I know, it’s tempting to want to dig right in as soon as it comes out of the oven! But let it cool in the pan for 15 minutes and then on a wire rack for an additional 15 minutes to ensure it will slice neatly.

Real talk: this is one of my most favorite things I’ve ever made, and I’ve made a lot of things in my kitchen. I will always take savory over sweet, and I firmly believe that carbs + cheese is the ultimate match made in heaven. Yes, this is a little more hands-on than typical pizza, but it is so, so very worth it. Trust me.


Pizza Babka

The marriage of the two best uses for yeast in the history of mankind. Babka dough paired with pizza toppings.

We’re going savory for this month’s Babka of the Month, and I have zero regrets. None. Step aside, chocolate babka — pizza babka is the true winner.

I’m not going to claim to be original here pizza babka is a thing. There are several other recipes on the internet. But I was surprised to find that they all use pizza dough as the base (or in one case, challah dough). I’d call those a babka-shaped pizza loaf. But if we’re talking about pizza babka, shouldn’t we use… babka dough?

What is Babka Dough?

I answered this briefly in my chocolate babka recipe which kicked off this whole babka endeavor. But in short, classic babka dough is rich with eggs, milk, and butter.

My babka dough recipe (which makes two loaves) contains 1 cup of milk, 2 eggs, and 12 tablespoons of butter. I looked at zillion different pizza dough recipes in comparison (like Food Network’s Giada de Laurentiis recipe, King Arthur Flour recipe, and Bon Appetit’s recipe), and none contain any milk, eggs, or butter whatsoever.

In other words, pizza dough ≠ babka dough. We’re going to make a REAL babka pizza today, friends!

How to Make Babka Pizza Dough

I wanted to keep the rich, eggy, buttery dough base that we know and love as babka, but since we’re going savory, we don’t need the bread to be sweet. To achieve this, I cut out some of the sugar from my original babka dough recipe and doubled the salt (and added garlic powder because everything is better with garlic).

Why include sugar at all? Does yeast actually need sugar to work? It’s time for my favorite subject: kitchen chemistry!

Kitchen Chemistry

There’s a common misconception that yeast needs to feed on sugar. This is totally false — yeast can thrive just fine on flour. (In fact, those pizza dough recipes I included above? Two of them do not include any sugar at all.) So why are we adding it to this dough? Sugar acts as a tenderizer, creating a fine crumb in baked goods. We want this babka to retain the bread-like properties, so keeping some sugar in the dough keeps it soft and crumby. Sugar also promotes browning — we don’t need this in a pizza since it’s cooked at such high temperature. For baking at lower temepratures, however, sugar helps crusts turn brown. By adding sugar to the dough, the babka will darken while it cooks, giving a visual appearance like a pizza cooked at a high temperature.

Babka Pizza Toppings

We went classic with our pizza toppings: some grated Pecorino Romano, tomato sauce, pepperoni (by request of my 3 year old), and shredded mozzarella cheese. The key here is to go minimal with the fillings: this isn’t a loaded pizza! Everything needs to roll up neatly into a log.

You can certainly substitute with any of your favorite pizza toppings. Make sure nothing is too wet or it won’t bake well (so dry those olives with a paper towel first!) and that any raw vegetables are cooked. Because they’re tucked inside the babka, they won’t be exposed to high heat like they are on a pizza.

Need a refresher on how to roll a babka into a nice long loaf? I have detailed pictures on both my best chocolate babka recipe and cinnamon hazelnut babka recipe!

How to Store Pizza Babka

Because this contains tomato sauce and cheese, you’ll want to refrigerate your pizza babka leftovers (if you have any!). Wrap tightly in foil or store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Pizza babka reheats well in a 350 °F oven for 5-10 minutes, or can be cooked over medium heat in a non-stick skillet until warmed through. Buuuuut I actually wound up loving it cold. I expected it would be better reheated, but straight out of the fridge a few days later was absolutely delicious!

Pizza Babka Tips and Tricks

  1. Refrigerate the dough for the second hour of the first rise. When the dough is cold, it rolls out beautifully and with no real need to add excess flour.
  2. Use a thicker tomato sauce as a topping. If your sauce is too thin, reduce it on the stove for 15 – 20 minutes.
  3. Cook and dry any vegetables before adding as a topping. Ensure everything is cooled – adding warm toppings to the dough will start to melt the butter in the dough.
  4. Refrigerate the rolled babka before slicing. This will help minimize tomato sauce and other toppings spilling out when the dough roll is sliced in half.
  5. Brush the babka dough with olive oil and sprinkle with some additional Pecorino Romano, garlic powder, and Italian herbs before baking. This creates a delicious outside crust.
  6. Use a thermometer to determine if the babka is done. Babka bread is thick, and when it’s full of tomato sauce and melty cheese, it can be hard to use a tester to determine if the center of the loaf is fully cooked. Take out the guess work and use an instant-read thermometer: when the center of the loaf hits 190 °F, it’s done!
  7. Allow the babka to cool for at least 30 minutes before slicing. I know, it’s tempting to want to dig right in as soon as it comes out of the oven! But let it cool in the pan for 15 minutes and then on a wire rack for an additional 15 minutes to ensure it will slice neatly.

Real talk: this is one of my most favorite things I’ve ever made, and I’ve made a lot of things in my kitchen. I will always take savory over sweet, and I firmly believe that carbs + cheese is the ultimate match made in heaven. Yes, this is a little more hands-on than typical pizza, but it is so, so very worth it. Trust me.


Pizza Babka

The marriage of the two best uses for yeast in the history of mankind. Babka dough paired with pizza toppings.

We’re going savory for this month’s Babka of the Month, and I have zero regrets. None. Step aside, chocolate babka — pizza babka is the true winner.

I’m not going to claim to be original here pizza babka is a thing. There are several other recipes on the internet. But I was surprised to find that they all use pizza dough as the base (or in one case, challah dough). I’d call those a babka-shaped pizza loaf. But if we’re talking about pizza babka, shouldn’t we use… babka dough?

What is Babka Dough?

I answered this briefly in my chocolate babka recipe which kicked off this whole babka endeavor. But in short, classic babka dough is rich with eggs, milk, and butter.

My babka dough recipe (which makes two loaves) contains 1 cup of milk, 2 eggs, and 12 tablespoons of butter. I looked at zillion different pizza dough recipes in comparison (like Food Network’s Giada de Laurentiis recipe, King Arthur Flour recipe, and Bon Appetit’s recipe), and none contain any milk, eggs, or butter whatsoever.

In other words, pizza dough ≠ babka dough. We’re going to make a REAL babka pizza today, friends!

How to Make Babka Pizza Dough

I wanted to keep the rich, eggy, buttery dough base that we know and love as babka, but since we’re going savory, we don’t need the bread to be sweet. To achieve this, I cut out some of the sugar from my original babka dough recipe and doubled the salt (and added garlic powder because everything is better with garlic).

Why include sugar at all? Does yeast actually need sugar to work? It’s time for my favorite subject: kitchen chemistry!

Kitchen Chemistry

There’s a common misconception that yeast needs to feed on sugar. This is totally false — yeast can thrive just fine on flour. (In fact, those pizza dough recipes I included above? Two of them do not include any sugar at all.) So why are we adding it to this dough? Sugar acts as a tenderizer, creating a fine crumb in baked goods. We want this babka to retain the bread-like properties, so keeping some sugar in the dough keeps it soft and crumby. Sugar also promotes browning — we don’t need this in a pizza since it’s cooked at such high temperature. For baking at lower temepratures, however, sugar helps crusts turn brown. By adding sugar to the dough, the babka will darken while it cooks, giving a visual appearance like a pizza cooked at a high temperature.

Babka Pizza Toppings

We went classic with our pizza toppings: some grated Pecorino Romano, tomato sauce, pepperoni (by request of my 3 year old), and shredded mozzarella cheese. The key here is to go minimal with the fillings: this isn’t a loaded pizza! Everything needs to roll up neatly into a log.

You can certainly substitute with any of your favorite pizza toppings. Make sure nothing is too wet or it won’t bake well (so dry those olives with a paper towel first!) and that any raw vegetables are cooked. Because they’re tucked inside the babka, they won’t be exposed to high heat like they are on a pizza.

Need a refresher on how to roll a babka into a nice long loaf? I have detailed pictures on both my best chocolate babka recipe and cinnamon hazelnut babka recipe!

How to Store Pizza Babka

Because this contains tomato sauce and cheese, you’ll want to refrigerate your pizza babka leftovers (if you have any!). Wrap tightly in foil or store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Pizza babka reheats well in a 350 °F oven for 5-10 minutes, or can be cooked over medium heat in a non-stick skillet until warmed through. Buuuuut I actually wound up loving it cold. I expected it would be better reheated, but straight out of the fridge a few days later was absolutely delicious!

Pizza Babka Tips and Tricks

  1. Refrigerate the dough for the second hour of the first rise. When the dough is cold, it rolls out beautifully and with no real need to add excess flour.
  2. Use a thicker tomato sauce as a topping. If your sauce is too thin, reduce it on the stove for 15 – 20 minutes.
  3. Cook and dry any vegetables before adding as a topping. Ensure everything is cooled – adding warm toppings to the dough will start to melt the butter in the dough.
  4. Refrigerate the rolled babka before slicing. This will help minimize tomato sauce and other toppings spilling out when the dough roll is sliced in half.
  5. Brush the babka dough with olive oil and sprinkle with some additional Pecorino Romano, garlic powder, and Italian herbs before baking. This creates a delicious outside crust.
  6. Use a thermometer to determine if the babka is done. Babka bread is thick, and when it’s full of tomato sauce and melty cheese, it can be hard to use a tester to determine if the center of the loaf is fully cooked. Take out the guess work and use an instant-read thermometer: when the center of the loaf hits 190 °F, it’s done!
  7. Allow the babka to cool for at least 30 minutes before slicing. I know, it’s tempting to want to dig right in as soon as it comes out of the oven! But let it cool in the pan for 15 minutes and then on a wire rack for an additional 15 minutes to ensure it will slice neatly.

Real talk: this is one of my most favorite things I’ve ever made, and I’ve made a lot of things in my kitchen. I will always take savory over sweet, and I firmly believe that carbs + cheese is the ultimate match made in heaven. Yes, this is a little more hands-on than typical pizza, but it is so, so very worth it. Trust me.


Pizza Babka

The marriage of the two best uses for yeast in the history of mankind. Babka dough paired with pizza toppings.

We’re going savory for this month’s Babka of the Month, and I have zero regrets. None. Step aside, chocolate babka — pizza babka is the true winner.

I’m not going to claim to be original here pizza babka is a thing. There are several other recipes on the internet. But I was surprised to find that they all use pizza dough as the base (or in one case, challah dough). I’d call those a babka-shaped pizza loaf. But if we’re talking about pizza babka, shouldn’t we use… babka dough?

What is Babka Dough?

I answered this briefly in my chocolate babka recipe which kicked off this whole babka endeavor. But in short, classic babka dough is rich with eggs, milk, and butter.

My babka dough recipe (which makes two loaves) contains 1 cup of milk, 2 eggs, and 12 tablespoons of butter. I looked at zillion different pizza dough recipes in comparison (like Food Network’s Giada de Laurentiis recipe, King Arthur Flour recipe, and Bon Appetit’s recipe), and none contain any milk, eggs, or butter whatsoever.

In other words, pizza dough ≠ babka dough. We’re going to make a REAL babka pizza today, friends!

How to Make Babka Pizza Dough

I wanted to keep the rich, eggy, buttery dough base that we know and love as babka, but since we’re going savory, we don’t need the bread to be sweet. To achieve this, I cut out some of the sugar from my original babka dough recipe and doubled the salt (and added garlic powder because everything is better with garlic).

Why include sugar at all? Does yeast actually need sugar to work? It’s time for my favorite subject: kitchen chemistry!

Kitchen Chemistry

There’s a common misconception that yeast needs to feed on sugar. This is totally false — yeast can thrive just fine on flour. (In fact, those pizza dough recipes I included above? Two of them do not include any sugar at all.) So why are we adding it to this dough? Sugar acts as a tenderizer, creating a fine crumb in baked goods. We want this babka to retain the bread-like properties, so keeping some sugar in the dough keeps it soft and crumby. Sugar also promotes browning — we don’t need this in a pizza since it’s cooked at such high temperature. For baking at lower temepratures, however, sugar helps crusts turn brown. By adding sugar to the dough, the babka will darken while it cooks, giving a visual appearance like a pizza cooked at a high temperature.

Babka Pizza Toppings

We went classic with our pizza toppings: some grated Pecorino Romano, tomato sauce, pepperoni (by request of my 3 year old), and shredded mozzarella cheese. The key here is to go minimal with the fillings: this isn’t a loaded pizza! Everything needs to roll up neatly into a log.

You can certainly substitute with any of your favorite pizza toppings. Make sure nothing is too wet or it won’t bake well (so dry those olives with a paper towel first!) and that any raw vegetables are cooked. Because they’re tucked inside the babka, they won’t be exposed to high heat like they are on a pizza.

Need a refresher on how to roll a babka into a nice long loaf? I have detailed pictures on both my best chocolate babka recipe and cinnamon hazelnut babka recipe!

How to Store Pizza Babka

Because this contains tomato sauce and cheese, you’ll want to refrigerate your pizza babka leftovers (if you have any!). Wrap tightly in foil or store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Pizza babka reheats well in a 350 °F oven for 5-10 minutes, or can be cooked over medium heat in a non-stick skillet until warmed through. Buuuuut I actually wound up loving it cold. I expected it would be better reheated, but straight out of the fridge a few days later was absolutely delicious!

Pizza Babka Tips and Tricks

  1. Refrigerate the dough for the second hour of the first rise. When the dough is cold, it rolls out beautifully and with no real need to add excess flour.
  2. Use a thicker tomato sauce as a topping. If your sauce is too thin, reduce it on the stove for 15 – 20 minutes.
  3. Cook and dry any vegetables before adding as a topping. Ensure everything is cooled – adding warm toppings to the dough will start to melt the butter in the dough.
  4. Refrigerate the rolled babka before slicing. This will help minimize tomato sauce and other toppings spilling out when the dough roll is sliced in half.
  5. Brush the babka dough with olive oil and sprinkle with some additional Pecorino Romano, garlic powder, and Italian herbs before baking. This creates a delicious outside crust.
  6. Use a thermometer to determine if the babka is done. Babka bread is thick, and when it’s full of tomato sauce and melty cheese, it can be hard to use a tester to determine if the center of the loaf is fully cooked. Take out the guess work and use an instant-read thermometer: when the center of the loaf hits 190 °F, it’s done!
  7. Allow the babka to cool for at least 30 minutes before slicing. I know, it’s tempting to want to dig right in as soon as it comes out of the oven! But let it cool in the pan for 15 minutes and then on a wire rack for an additional 15 minutes to ensure it will slice neatly.

Real talk: this is one of my most favorite things I’ve ever made, and I’ve made a lot of things in my kitchen. I will always take savory over sweet, and I firmly believe that carbs + cheese is the ultimate match made in heaven. Yes, this is a little more hands-on than typical pizza, but it is so, so very worth it. Trust me.


Pizza Babka

The marriage of the two best uses for yeast in the history of mankind. Babka dough paired with pizza toppings.

We’re going savory for this month’s Babka of the Month, and I have zero regrets. None. Step aside, chocolate babka — pizza babka is the true winner.

I’m not going to claim to be original here pizza babka is a thing. There are several other recipes on the internet. But I was surprised to find that they all use pizza dough as the base (or in one case, challah dough). I’d call those a babka-shaped pizza loaf. But if we’re talking about pizza babka, shouldn’t we use… babka dough?

What is Babka Dough?

I answered this briefly in my chocolate babka recipe which kicked off this whole babka endeavor. But in short, classic babka dough is rich with eggs, milk, and butter.

My babka dough recipe (which makes two loaves) contains 1 cup of milk, 2 eggs, and 12 tablespoons of butter. I looked at zillion different pizza dough recipes in comparison (like Food Network’s Giada de Laurentiis recipe, King Arthur Flour recipe, and Bon Appetit’s recipe), and none contain any milk, eggs, or butter whatsoever.

In other words, pizza dough ≠ babka dough. We’re going to make a REAL babka pizza today, friends!

How to Make Babka Pizza Dough

I wanted to keep the rich, eggy, buttery dough base that we know and love as babka, but since we’re going savory, we don’t need the bread to be sweet. To achieve this, I cut out some of the sugar from my original babka dough recipe and doubled the salt (and added garlic powder because everything is better with garlic).

Why include sugar at all? Does yeast actually need sugar to work? It’s time for my favorite subject: kitchen chemistry!

Kitchen Chemistry

There’s a common misconception that yeast needs to feed on sugar. This is totally false — yeast can thrive just fine on flour. (In fact, those pizza dough recipes I included above? Two of them do not include any sugar at all.) So why are we adding it to this dough? Sugar acts as a tenderizer, creating a fine crumb in baked goods. We want this babka to retain the bread-like properties, so keeping some sugar in the dough keeps it soft and crumby. Sugar also promotes browning — we don’t need this in a pizza since it’s cooked at such high temperature. For baking at lower temepratures, however, sugar helps crusts turn brown. By adding sugar to the dough, the babka will darken while it cooks, giving a visual appearance like a pizza cooked at a high temperature.

Babka Pizza Toppings

We went classic with our pizza toppings: some grated Pecorino Romano, tomato sauce, pepperoni (by request of my 3 year old), and shredded mozzarella cheese. The key here is to go minimal with the fillings: this isn’t a loaded pizza! Everything needs to roll up neatly into a log.

You can certainly substitute with any of your favorite pizza toppings. Make sure nothing is too wet or it won’t bake well (so dry those olives with a paper towel first!) and that any raw vegetables are cooked. Because they’re tucked inside the babka, they won’t be exposed to high heat like they are on a pizza.

Need a refresher on how to roll a babka into a nice long loaf? I have detailed pictures on both my best chocolate babka recipe and cinnamon hazelnut babka recipe!

How to Store Pizza Babka

Because this contains tomato sauce and cheese, you’ll want to refrigerate your pizza babka leftovers (if you have any!). Wrap tightly in foil or store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Pizza babka reheats well in a 350 °F oven for 5-10 minutes, or can be cooked over medium heat in a non-stick skillet until warmed through. Buuuuut I actually wound up loving it cold. I expected it would be better reheated, but straight out of the fridge a few days later was absolutely delicious!

Pizza Babka Tips and Tricks

  1. Refrigerate the dough for the second hour of the first rise. When the dough is cold, it rolls out beautifully and with no real need to add excess flour.
  2. Use a thicker tomato sauce as a topping. If your sauce is too thin, reduce it on the stove for 15 – 20 minutes.
  3. Cook and dry any vegetables before adding as a topping. Ensure everything is cooled – adding warm toppings to the dough will start to melt the butter in the dough.
  4. Refrigerate the rolled babka before slicing. This will help minimize tomato sauce and other toppings spilling out when the dough roll is sliced in half.
  5. Brush the babka dough with olive oil and sprinkle with some additional Pecorino Romano, garlic powder, and Italian herbs before baking. This creates a delicious outside crust.
  6. Use a thermometer to determine if the babka is done. Babka bread is thick, and when it’s full of tomato sauce and melty cheese, it can be hard to use a tester to determine if the center of the loaf is fully cooked. Take out the guess work and use an instant-read thermometer: when the center of the loaf hits 190 °F, it’s done!
  7. Allow the babka to cool for at least 30 minutes before slicing. I know, it’s tempting to want to dig right in as soon as it comes out of the oven! But let it cool in the pan for 15 minutes and then on a wire rack for an additional 15 minutes to ensure it will slice neatly.

Real talk: this is one of my most favorite things I’ve ever made, and I’ve made a lot of things in my kitchen. I will always take savory over sweet, and I firmly believe that carbs + cheese is the ultimate match made in heaven. Yes, this is a little more hands-on than typical pizza, but it is so, so very worth it. Trust me.


Pizza Babka

The marriage of the two best uses for yeast in the history of mankind. Babka dough paired with pizza toppings.

We’re going savory for this month’s Babka of the Month, and I have zero regrets. None. Step aside, chocolate babka — pizza babka is the true winner.

I’m not going to claim to be original here pizza babka is a thing. There are several other recipes on the internet. But I was surprised to find that they all use pizza dough as the base (or in one case, challah dough). I’d call those a babka-shaped pizza loaf. But if we’re talking about pizza babka, shouldn’t we use… babka dough?

What is Babka Dough?

I answered this briefly in my chocolate babka recipe which kicked off this whole babka endeavor. But in short, classic babka dough is rich with eggs, milk, and butter.

My babka dough recipe (which makes two loaves) contains 1 cup of milk, 2 eggs, and 12 tablespoons of butter. I looked at zillion different pizza dough recipes in comparison (like Food Network’s Giada de Laurentiis recipe, King Arthur Flour recipe, and Bon Appetit’s recipe), and none contain any milk, eggs, or butter whatsoever.

In other words, pizza dough ≠ babka dough. We’re going to make a REAL babka pizza today, friends!

How to Make Babka Pizza Dough

I wanted to keep the rich, eggy, buttery dough base that we know and love as babka, but since we’re going savory, we don’t need the bread to be sweet. To achieve this, I cut out some of the sugar from my original babka dough recipe and doubled the salt (and added garlic powder because everything is better with garlic).

Why include sugar at all? Does yeast actually need sugar to work? It’s time for my favorite subject: kitchen chemistry!

Kitchen Chemistry

There’s a common misconception that yeast needs to feed on sugar. This is totally false — yeast can thrive just fine on flour. (In fact, those pizza dough recipes I included above? Two of them do not include any sugar at all.) So why are we adding it to this dough? Sugar acts as a tenderizer, creating a fine crumb in baked goods. We want this babka to retain the bread-like properties, so keeping some sugar in the dough keeps it soft and crumby. Sugar also promotes browning — we don’t need this in a pizza since it’s cooked at such high temperature. For baking at lower temepratures, however, sugar helps crusts turn brown. By adding sugar to the dough, the babka will darken while it cooks, giving a visual appearance like a pizza cooked at a high temperature.

Babka Pizza Toppings

We went classic with our pizza toppings: some grated Pecorino Romano, tomato sauce, pepperoni (by request of my 3 year old), and shredded mozzarella cheese. The key here is to go minimal with the fillings: this isn’t a loaded pizza! Everything needs to roll up neatly into a log.

You can certainly substitute with any of your favorite pizza toppings. Make sure nothing is too wet or it won’t bake well (so dry those olives with a paper towel first!) and that any raw vegetables are cooked. Because they’re tucked inside the babka, they won’t be exposed to high heat like they are on a pizza.

Need a refresher on how to roll a babka into a nice long loaf? I have detailed pictures on both my best chocolate babka recipe and cinnamon hazelnut babka recipe!

How to Store Pizza Babka

Because this contains tomato sauce and cheese, you’ll want to refrigerate your pizza babka leftovers (if you have any!). Wrap tightly in foil or store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Pizza babka reheats well in a 350 °F oven for 5-10 minutes, or can be cooked over medium heat in a non-stick skillet until warmed through. Buuuuut I actually wound up loving it cold. I expected it would be better reheated, but straight out of the fridge a few days later was absolutely delicious!

Pizza Babka Tips and Tricks

  1. Refrigerate the dough for the second hour of the first rise. When the dough is cold, it rolls out beautifully and with no real need to add excess flour.
  2. Use a thicker tomato sauce as a topping. If your sauce is too thin, reduce it on the stove for 15 – 20 minutes.
  3. Cook and dry any vegetables before adding as a topping. Ensure everything is cooled – adding warm toppings to the dough will start to melt the butter in the dough.
  4. Refrigerate the rolled babka before slicing. This will help minimize tomato sauce and other toppings spilling out when the dough roll is sliced in half.
  5. Brush the babka dough with olive oil and sprinkle with some additional Pecorino Romano, garlic powder, and Italian herbs before baking. This creates a delicious outside crust.
  6. Use a thermometer to determine if the babka is done. Babka bread is thick, and when it’s full of tomato sauce and melty cheese, it can be hard to use a tester to determine if the center of the loaf is fully cooked. Take out the guess work and use an instant-read thermometer: when the center of the loaf hits 190 °F, it’s done!
  7. Allow the babka to cool for at least 30 minutes before slicing. I know, it’s tempting to want to dig right in as soon as it comes out of the oven! But let it cool in the pan for 15 minutes and then on a wire rack for an additional 15 minutes to ensure it will slice neatly.

Real talk: this is one of my most favorite things I’ve ever made, and I’ve made a lot of things in my kitchen. I will always take savory over sweet, and I firmly believe that carbs + cheese is the ultimate match made in heaven. Yes, this is a little more hands-on than typical pizza, but it is so, so very worth it. Trust me.


Pizza Babka

The marriage of the two best uses for yeast in the history of mankind. Babka dough paired with pizza toppings.

We’re going savory for this month’s Babka of the Month, and I have zero regrets. None. Step aside, chocolate babka — pizza babka is the true winner.

I’m not going to claim to be original here pizza babka is a thing. There are several other recipes on the internet. But I was surprised to find that they all use pizza dough as the base (or in one case, challah dough). I’d call those a babka-shaped pizza loaf. But if we’re talking about pizza babka, shouldn’t we use… babka dough?

What is Babka Dough?

I answered this briefly in my chocolate babka recipe which kicked off this whole babka endeavor. But in short, classic babka dough is rich with eggs, milk, and butter.

My babka dough recipe (which makes two loaves) contains 1 cup of milk, 2 eggs, and 12 tablespoons of butter. I looked at zillion different pizza dough recipes in comparison (like Food Network’s Giada de Laurentiis recipe, King Arthur Flour recipe, and Bon Appetit’s recipe), and none contain any milk, eggs, or butter whatsoever.

In other words, pizza dough ≠ babka dough. We’re going to make a REAL babka pizza today, friends!

How to Make Babka Pizza Dough

I wanted to keep the rich, eggy, buttery dough base that we know and love as babka, but since we’re going savory, we don’t need the bread to be sweet. To achieve this, I cut out some of the sugar from my original babka dough recipe and doubled the salt (and added garlic powder because everything is better with garlic).

Why include sugar at all? Does yeast actually need sugar to work? It’s time for my favorite subject: kitchen chemistry!

Kitchen Chemistry

There’s a common misconception that yeast needs to feed on sugar. This is totally false — yeast can thrive just fine on flour. (In fact, those pizza dough recipes I included above? Two of them do not include any sugar at all.) So why are we adding it to this dough? Sugar acts as a tenderizer, creating a fine crumb in baked goods. We want this babka to retain the bread-like properties, so keeping some sugar in the dough keeps it soft and crumby. Sugar also promotes browning — we don’t need this in a pizza since it’s cooked at such high temperature. For baking at lower temepratures, however, sugar helps crusts turn brown. By adding sugar to the dough, the babka will darken while it cooks, giving a visual appearance like a pizza cooked at a high temperature.

Babka Pizza Toppings

We went classic with our pizza toppings: some grated Pecorino Romano, tomato sauce, pepperoni (by request of my 3 year old), and shredded mozzarella cheese. The key here is to go minimal with the fillings: this isn’t a loaded pizza! Everything needs to roll up neatly into a log.

You can certainly substitute with any of your favorite pizza toppings. Make sure nothing is too wet or it won’t bake well (so dry those olives with a paper towel first!) and that any raw vegetables are cooked. Because they’re tucked inside the babka, they won’t be exposed to high heat like they are on a pizza.

Need a refresher on how to roll a babka into a nice long loaf? I have detailed pictures on both my best chocolate babka recipe and cinnamon hazelnut babka recipe!

How to Store Pizza Babka

Because this contains tomato sauce and cheese, you’ll want to refrigerate your pizza babka leftovers (if you have any!). Wrap tightly in foil or store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Pizza babka reheats well in a 350 °F oven for 5-10 minutes, or can be cooked over medium heat in a non-stick skillet until warmed through. Buuuuut I actually wound up loving it cold. I expected it would be better reheated, but straight out of the fridge a few days later was absolutely delicious!

Pizza Babka Tips and Tricks

  1. Refrigerate the dough for the second hour of the first rise. When the dough is cold, it rolls out beautifully and with no real need to add excess flour.
  2. Use a thicker tomato sauce as a topping. If your sauce is too thin, reduce it on the stove for 15 – 20 minutes.
  3. Cook and dry any vegetables before adding as a topping. Ensure everything is cooled – adding warm toppings to the dough will start to melt the butter in the dough.
  4. Refrigerate the rolled babka before slicing. This will help minimize tomato sauce and other toppings spilling out when the dough roll is sliced in half.
  5. Brush the babka dough with olive oil and sprinkle with some additional Pecorino Romano, garlic powder, and Italian herbs before baking. This creates a delicious outside crust.
  6. Use a thermometer to determine if the babka is done. Babka bread is thick, and when it’s full of tomato sauce and melty cheese, it can be hard to use a tester to determine if the center of the loaf is fully cooked. Take out the guess work and use an instant-read thermometer: when the center of the loaf hits 190 °F, it’s done!
  7. Allow the babka to cool for at least 30 minutes before slicing. I know, it’s tempting to want to dig right in as soon as it comes out of the oven! But let it cool in the pan for 15 minutes and then on a wire rack for an additional 15 minutes to ensure it will slice neatly.

Real talk: this is one of my most favorite things I’ve ever made, and I’ve made a lot of things in my kitchen. I will always take savory over sweet, and I firmly believe that carbs + cheese is the ultimate match made in heaven. Yes, this is a little more hands-on than typical pizza, but it is so, so very worth it. Trust me.